GroundSwell - GroundSwell is a new book by genius Forrester analysts, Charlene Li and Josh Bernoff. Through Forrester, they have access to the data about how people are using social media sites. As we learned from the amazing attendance at this week's social media webinar, a lot of people are trying to figure out how to engage in social media to promote their businesses. Social media sites are where your next customer is hanging out. And your next one. And your next one. You should be there too.
Oftentimes, we get so wrapped up in our industry that we forget that others, especially customers, don't necessarily use the same terms as us. By using terms that are different from those of your target audience, your organic traffic will suffer and your website won't be nearly as effective. When you talk to your customers during the branding exercise, see what terms they use. Use keyword research to validate your findings and use this language on the website.
SEO techniques can be classified into two broad categories: techniques that search engine companies recommend as part of good design ("white hat"), and those techniques of which search engines do not approve ("black hat"). The search engines attempt to minimize the effect of the latter, among them spamdexing. Industry commentators have classified these methods, and the practitioners who employ them, as either white hat SEO, or black hat SEO.[49] White hats tend to produce results that last a long time, whereas black hats anticipate that their sites may eventually be banned either temporarily or permanently once the search engines discover what they are doing.[50]
Great post here Morgan! But not all businesses are easy to promote like, adult niche or escort services.. How would you promote a service if you have a client like this? I know it's not really necessary to create content when you're in an adult industry, but I just want to read your point of view when promoting adult related services/products. Thanks! :-)
Webmasters and content providers began optimizing websites for search engines in the mid-1990s, as the first search engines were cataloging the early Web. Initially, all webmasters only needed to submit the address of a page, or URL, to the various engines which would send a "spider" to "crawl" that page, extract links to other pages from it, and return information found on the page to be indexed.[5] The process involves a search engine spider downloading a page and storing it on the search engine's own server. A second program, known as an indexer, extracts information about the page, such as the words it contains, where they are located, and any weight for specific words, as well as all links the page contains. All of this information is then placed into a scheduler for crawling at a later date.
We all look out for honest insights that answer our intriguing questions and provide bold insights on content marketing. This blog will definitely satisfy your curiosity if you are an influencer interested in digital marketing information. The sites’ blog posts share in-depth industry knowledge and experiences and have a unique approach to brands, agencies, publishers, and platforms from novel angles.
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