When traffic is coming to your website or blog, nearly unfettered, it gives you the opportunity to test out a variety of marketing initiatives. However, without that traffic, you're forced to spend money on costly ads before really determining the effectiveness of your offers and uncovering your cost-per acquisition (CPA), two things which are at the core of scaling out any business online.
About Blog Michael Brenner is CEO of Marketing Insider Group providing content marketing strategy, content development and content marketing workshops. Marketing Insider Group provide consultants who have built successful marketing programs from the inside and know the challenges, the politics, the budget constraints, and the pressure to show real results.
Once you have content to share, decide which social platforms best fit your company's mission. For example, LinkedIn and Twitter are usually better for B2B while Facebook is better for B2C. Just like you don't have to chase every marketing strategy, you don't have to have a social campaign for every platform. Concentrate on the one or two that will best reach your audience. Make sure the content you're sharing will do well on that platform. For Facebook and Pinterest, you'll need image based content while Twitter and LinkedIn will be best for article-based content or quick updates.
Consider the example of Zoka coffee, a small, Pacific Northwest chain. They had a Facebook profile but very few followers. In order to increase the impact of their social media efforts, they created a new eye-catching profile picture and page design. Zoka coffee then identified trend setters in the world of coffee, and started targeting them with Twitter and Facebook posts to spread the word about their brand. The company also used online contests and promotions to create incentives for followers, eventually leading to an 800% increase in traffic. (See also Facebook Marketing)
1. Not having an onsite content strategy. Prior to Google's Panda algorithm update last year, it was common to see small, one-page microsites dominating the search engine results pages (SERPs) based on the strength of their inbound link profiles -- the links pointing to these microsites from external websites -- rather than the quality of their onsite content.
The majority of the content that you create for your brand or business should originate on your own website or blog, right? We certainly believe this to be the case. However, Facebook’s newest addition, called Facebook Instant Articles, could change how we all think about content creation and distribution. Learn more about Facebook Instant Articles; how they…
In 1998, two graduate students at Stanford University, Larry Page and Sergey Brin, developed "Backrub", a search engine that relied on a mathematical algorithm to rate the prominence of web pages. The number calculated by the algorithm, PageRank, is a function of the quantity and strength of inbound links.[21] PageRank estimates the likelihood that a given page will be reached by a web user who randomly surfs the web, and follows links from one page to another. In effect, this means that some links are stronger than others, as a higher PageRank page is more likely to be reached by the random web surfer.
PPC advertising is a method of advertising on search engines like Google and Bing. As mentioned earlier, with PPC ads, you pay each time that ad is clicked on. PPC ads also exist on social media platforms like Instagram and Facebook as well. However, if you're going to engage in PPC advertising, it's important that you determine conversion rates by using tracking pixels.
While the previous sentence makes sense to just about everyone reading it, we also know that in practice, content promotion is more often an afterthought than a key part of content planning. It shouldn’t be a special case to improve organic search visibility, social engagement, industry media pickups and influencer shares of your content for all the (relevant) world to see, but the standard when it comes to B2B content marketing.
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